Intel Gemini Lake series processors have bugs in the execution of some software


Intel Gemini Lake series processors have bugs in the execution of some software

Intel Gemini Lake series processors have bugs in the execution of some software

Based on a report from tech site Phoronix, Google and Mozilla have experienced unexpected crashes when using their browsers on Gemini Lake series based processors. These processors from Stepping are a sixth family and model 122. These crashes have been confirmed to occur when using the 64-bit version of Chrome and Firefox , and other software may also be affected. Google and Mozilla have investigated this issue and have come up with a solution.

    • Intel unveiled the 10th generation CORE-X processors and XEON W-2200 chips

As a reminder, it is necessary to mention that Geminilake series processors are based on low-power Atom chips. are made for cheap and portable devices, especially laptops. The architecture used in this series of chips is not similar to the architecture common in the Core family chips, including the Sky Lake series, Coffee Lake, Cascade Lake and . Therefore, the existing bugs only plague a handful of processors based on the Geminilake series and are not present in other processors of this company such as the Core and Xeon series.

The software crash only occurs in the preliminary code of the two functions, and the analysis on this issue shows that the instructions that lead to the software crash follow two patterns. does: in the GetFieldIndex() command code, the last byte of the address is 1c, 5c, 9c or dc, or in the UpdateCaches function, the last byte of the address is 5d or 9d. It started in May of this year and in September, he was able to find a solution to solve the mentioned problem. Since the mentioned failure when reading wrong instructions occurs when the size of these codes exceeds 16 bytes; The solution Google came up with is to force the processor to read commands without exceeding the specified 16-byte boundary. Also, Mozilla, the publisher of Firefox software, has also conducted a research in this field and concluded that the problem of the browser’s failure is related to the update in the microcodes, and there is no problem in the hardware. /a> does not exist.

The easiest way to solve the created problem is to use the 32-bit version of the software; But now that companies are ending the use of 32-bit versions, it might be a little hard to find this version of the software. Fortunately, since this is a microcode problem, it is likely that Intel will be able to fix the issue without having to touch the hardware or issue a recall.

Update: Intel made a public statement in this regard published which you can see below:

Intel’s first priority is product reliability. Under a complex set of microarchitectural conditions, an end user could potentially experience hangs in applications running on systems based on Pentium Silver and Celeron chips, codenamed JiminyLeak. Intel has published an update in the microcodes for customers and partners of the company, which partially solves the mentioned problem, and with their cooperation, it is trying to provide this possibility for end users.

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